Category Archives: StampDocs

docs who have made it on stamp(s)

Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis

Ignaz Semmelweis was StampDoc, StatueDoc

An engraved portrait of Semmelweis: a mustachioed, balding man in formal attire, pictured from the chest up.

Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis, aged 42 in 1860
copperplate engraving by Jenő Doby
Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis[Note 1] (born Semmelweis Ignác Fülöp; 1 July 1818 – 13 August 1865) was a Hungarian physician of German extraction[2][3] now known as an early pioneer of antiseptic procedures. Described as the “savior of mothers”, Semmelweis discovered that the incidence of puerperal fever (also known as “childbed fever”) could be drastically cut by the use of hand disinfection in obstetrical clinics. Continue reading Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis

William Carlos Williams

William Carlos Williams was WriterDoc

 William Carlos Williams passport photograph 1921.jpg
William Carlos Williams (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963) was an American poet closely associated with modernism and imagism. Williams is often counted as being among a group of four major American poets who were all born in a twelve-year period that began in 1874. The group also consists of Robert Frost, who was born in 1874; Wallace Stevens, who was born in 1879; and Hilda “H.D.” Doolittle, who was born in 1886. Of these four, Williams died last, several weeks after Frost. (Stevens was first to die, in 1955, while H.D. lived until 1961). Continue reading William Carlos Williams

Hildegard von Bingen

Hildegard of Bingen was SpiritualDoc, ComposerDoc, PsalterDoc, NaturalistDoc, PhilosophyDoc, PublisherDoc, TranslatorDoc, StampDoc, CoinDoc

Hildegard von Bingen.jpg

Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary
Hildegard of Bingen, O.S.B. (German: Hildegard von Bingen; Latin: Hildegardis Bingensis) (1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Saint Hildegard and Sibyl of the Rhine, was a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath.[1] She is considered to be the founder of scientific natural history in Germany.[2] Continue reading Hildegard von Bingen

Friedrich Wolf

Friedrich Wolf was WriterDoc, DiplomatDoc, PhilosophyDoc, DirectorDoc, ArtHistoryDoc, PoliticDoc, StampDoc, CoinDoc, WriterDoc

Bundesarchiv Bild 183-14811-0013, Berlin, 3. Deutscher Schriftsteller-Kongress cropped.jpg
Friedrich Wolf (1952)

Friedrich Wolf (December 23, 1888 – October 5, 1953) was a German doctor and a politically engaged writer who at one stage, from 1949–51, served as his young country’s first ambassador to Poland.[1] Continue reading Friedrich Wolf

Sebastian Petrycy

Sebastian Petrycy was PhilosopherDoc, TranslatorDoc, StampDoc, WriterDoc, PublisherDoc

Sebastian Petrycy of Pilzno (1554–1626) was a Polish philosopher and physician. He lectured and published notable works in the field of medicine but is principally remembered for his masterly Polish translations of philosophical works byAristotle and for his commentaries to them. Petrycy made major contributions to nascent Polish philosophical terminology.[1] Continue reading Sebastian Petrycy

Józef Dietl

Józef Dietl was TeacherDoc, PoliticDoc,

Józef Dietl (24 January 1804 in Podbuże near Sambor – 18 January 1878 in Kraków) was an AustrianPolish physician born to an Austrian father and Polish mother. He studied medicine in Lviv and Vienna. He was a pioneer in balneology, and a professor of Jagiellonian University, elected as its rector in 1861. Dietl described the kidney ailment known as “Dietl’s Crisis” as well as its treatment.

From 1866 to 1874 Józef Dietl was mayor of the city of Kraków. Continue reading Józef Dietl

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer is OrganDoc, CharityDoc, MuseumDoc, TheologyDoc, PhilosophyDoc, NobelPrizeDoc, PeaceDoc, WriterDoc, MusicologyDoc, StampDoc, CoinDoc, CoverDoc, InventorDoc, InstrumentBuilderDoc

Albert Schweitzer (14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was a German—and later French—theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa, also known for his historical work on Jesus. He was born in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire, though he considered himself French[citation needed] and wrote mostly in French. Continue reading Albert Schweitzer

Paracelsus

Paracelsus was BotanicDoc, AstrologyDoc, OccultDoc (SpiritualDoc)

Paracelsus (/ˌpærəˈsɛlsəs/; born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 11 November or 17 December 1493 – 24 September 1541) was a Swiss German[3] Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist,astrologer, and general occultist.[4] He founded the discipline of Toxicology.[5] He is also known as a revolutionary for insisting upon using observations of nature, rather than looking to ancient texts, in open and radical defiance of medical practice of his day.[5] He is also credited for giving zinc its name, calling it zincum.[6][7] Modern psychology often also credits him for being the first to note that some diseases are rooted in psychological illness.[8] Continue reading Paracelsus