Category Archives: GardenDocs

docs with ain intensiv relation to gardens

Carl von Linné

Carl von Linné was GardenDoc, ZoologicDoc and more

Carl Linnaeus (/lɪˈnəs, lɪˈnəs/;[1][2] 23 May[note 1] 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné[3] (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈkɑːɭ ˈfɔnː lɪˈneː]), was a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature. He is known by the epithet “father of modern taxonomy”.[4] Many of his writings were in Latin, and his name is rendered in Latin as Carolus Linnæus (after 1761 Carolus a Linné). Continue reading Carl von Linné

Nina Silson

Nina Silson is ArtDoc, SwimDoc and GardenDoc

Dr Silson qualified in 2000 from University of Birmingham and worked in Birmingham, Worcestershire and New Zealand before joining the practice in 2006.
Her main clinical interests are Women’s Health and Paediatrics. She does Minor Surgery and fits Contraceptive Implants and Coils.
Her main interests include life drawing, swimming and, more recently, developing a vegetable patch.
Married with 3 children.

web work

Moritz Schreber

Moritz Schreber was GardenDoc and more

SchreberMoritz-GardenDoc

Daniel Gottlob Moritz Schreber (15 October 1808 – 10 November 1861) was a German physician and university teacher at the University of Leipzig. In 1844, he became director of the Leipzig Heilanstalt (sanatorium). His publications predominantly dealt with the subject of children’s health and the social consequences of urbanization at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Continue reading Moritz Schreber

Ulisse Aldrovandi

Ulisse Aldrovandi was GardenDoc, NaturalistDoc, OrnithologyDoc, WriterDoc and more

AldrovandiUlisse-BotanicDoc

Ulisse Aldrovandi (11 September 1522 – 4 May 1605) was an Italian naturalist, the moving force behind Bologna’s botanical garden, one of the first in Europe. Carl Linnaeus and the comte de Buffon reckoned him the father of natural history studies. He is usually referred to, especially in older literature, as Aldrovandus; his name in Italian is equally given as Aldroandi.[1] Continue reading Ulisse Aldrovandi

Samuel Heinrich Schwabe

Samuel Heinrich Schwabe was AstronomyDoc and much more

SchwabeSamuelHeinrich-Daguerotypie

Samuel Heinrich Schwabe (25 October 1789 – 11 April 1875) a German astronomer remembered for his work on sunspots.

Schwabe was born at Dessau. At first an apothecary, he turned his attention to astronomy, and in 1826 commenced his observations on sunspots. Schwabe was trying to discover a new planet inside the orbit of Mercury which was tentatively called Vulcan. Because of the proximity to the Sun, it would have been very difficult to observe Vulcan, and Schwabe believed one possibility to detect the planet might be to see it as a dark spot when passing in front of the Sun. Continue reading Samuel Heinrich Schwabe

Paracelsus

Paracelsus was BotanicDoc, AstrologyDoc, OccultDoc (SpiritualDoc)

Paracelsus (/ˌpærəˈsɛlsəs/; born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 11 November or 17 December 1493 – 24 September 1541) was a Swiss German[3] Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist,astrologer, and general occultist.[4] He founded the discipline of Toxicology.[5] He is also known as a revolutionary for insisting upon using observations of nature, rather than looking to ancient texts, in open and radical defiance of medical practice of his day.[5] He is also credited for giving zinc its name, calling it zincum.[6][7] Modern psychology often also credits him for being the first to note that some diseases are rooted in psychological illness.[8] Continue reading Paracelsus