Tag Archives: Russia

Alexander Rozenbaum

Alexander Rozenbaum is BardDoc (Bard music, Pop-Jazz)

Alexander Yakovlevich Rosenbaum PAR (Russian: Александр Яковлевич Розенбаум, Aleksandr Jakovlevič Rozyenbaum) (born September 13, 1951 in Leningrad, Soviet Union) is a Soviet and Russian bard from Saint Petersburg. He is best known as an interpreter of the blatnaya pesnya (criminal song) genre. Modern singers in this genre, such as Mikhail Shufutinsky often sing Rosenbaum’s songs. Continue reading Alexander Rozenbaum

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov was WriterDoc

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: Анто́н Па́влович Че́хов, pronounced [ɐnˈton ˈpavləvʲɪtɕ ˈtɕɛxəf]; 29 January 1860[1] – 15 July 1904)[2] was a Russian playwright and short story writer, who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short fiction in history. His career as a playwright produced four classics and his best short stories are held in high esteem by writers and critics.[3][4] Along with Henrik Ibsen and August Strindberg, Chekhov is often referred to as one of the three seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre.[5] Chekhov practiced as a medical doctor throughout most of his literary career: “Medicine is my lawful wife”, he once said, “and literature is my mistress.
Continue reading Anton Chekhov

Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Afanasyevich Bulgakov was WriterDoc, TheatreDoc and more

Mikhail Afanasyevich Bulgakov (/bʊlˈɡɑːkəf/;[3] Russian: Михаи́л Афана́сьевич Булга́ков, pronounced [mʲɪxɐˈil ɐfɐˈnasʲjɪvʲɪtɕ bʊlˈɡakəf], ; 15 May [O.S. 3 May] 1891 – 10 March 1940) was a Russian writer, physician and playwright active in the first half of the 20th century.[1] He is best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, published posthumously, which has been called one of the masterpieces of the 20th century Continue reading Mikhail Bulgakov

Friedrich Joseph Haass

Friedrich Joseph Haass was PhilosopherDoc and CharityDoc

Friedrich Joseph Haass (Russian: Фёдор Петрович Гааз, Fyodor Petrovich Gaaz; August 10, 1780 – August 16, 1853) was the “holy doctor of Moscow”. Born in Bad Münstereifel, as a member of Moscow’s governmental prison committee, he spent 25 years until the end of his life to humanize the penal system. During the last nine years before his death he spent all of his assets to run a hospital for homeless people. He died in Moscow. Twenty thousand people attended his funeral at the Vvedenskoye Cemetery. Continue reading Friedrich Joseph Haass

Alexander Borodin

Alexander Borodin was ComposerDoc, ChemistryDoc and several important namings were given after him

BorodinAlexander-ComposerDoc

Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Порфи́рьевич Бороди́н; IPA: [ɐlʲɪkˈsandr pɐrˈfʲi rʲjɪvʲɪtɕ bərɐˈdʲin], 12 November 1833 – 27 February 1887)[1] was a Russian Romantic composer of Georgian origin, as well as a doctor and chemist. He was one of the prominent 19th century composers known as The Mighty Handful, a group dedicated to producing a uniquely Russian kind of classical music, rather than imitating earlier Western European models.[2][3][4]

Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor. Music from Prince Igor and his string quartets was later adapted for the US musical Kismet. A notable advocate of women’s rights, Borodin was a promoter of education in Russia and founded the School of Medicine for Women in St. Petersburg. Continue reading Alexander Borodin