Tag Archives: 1500-1549

Gerolamo Cardano

Gerolamo Cardano was InventorDoc and much more

Gerolamo (or Girolamo,[2] or Geronimo) Cardano (Italian: [dʒeˈrɔlamo karˈdano]; French: Jérôme Cardan; Latin: Hieronymus Cardanus; 24 September 1501 – 21 September 1576) was an Italian polymath, whose interests and proficiencies ranged from being a mathematician, physician, biologist, physicist, chemist, astrologer, astronomer, philosopher, writer, and gambler.[3] He was one of the most influential mathematicians of the Renaissance, and was one of the key figures in the foundation of probability and the earliest introducer of the binomial coefficients and the binomial theorem in the western world. He wrote more than 200 works on science. Continue reading Gerolamo Cardano

Nikolaus Kopernikus

Nikolaus Kopernikus is AstronomyDoc, MathDoc and more…

Nicolaus Copernicus (/kˈpɜːrnɪkəs, kə/;[1][2][3] Polish: Mikołaj Kopernik [miˈkɔwaj kɔˈpɛrɲik]; German: Nikolaus Kopernikus; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance mathematician, physician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe, likely independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier. Continue reading Nikolaus Kopernikus

Georg Forster

Georg Forster was WriterDoc and PublisherDoc

Georg Forster (ca. 1510 – 12 November 1568) was a German editor, composer and physician.

Forster was born at Amberg, in the Upper Palatinate. While a chorister at Elector Ludwig V’s court in Heidelberg around 1521, he was a colleague of Caspar Othmayr who would also become a composer of renown. Forster received his first instruction in composition from the Kapellmeister Lorenz Lemlin. He died at Nuremberg. Continue reading Georg Forster

Paracelsus

Paracelsus was BotanicDoc, AstrologyDoc, OccultDoc (SpiritualDoc)

Paracelsus (/ˌpærəˈsɛlsəs/; born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 11 November or 17 December 1493 – 24 September 1541) was a Swiss German[3] Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist,astrologer, and general occultist.[4] He founded the discipline of Toxicology.[5] He is also known as a revolutionary for insisting upon using observations of nature, rather than looking to ancient texts, in open and radical defiance of medical practice of his day.[5] He is also credited for giving zinc its name, calling it zincum.[6][7] Modern psychology often also credits him for being the first to note that some diseases are rooted in psychological illness.[8] Continue reading Paracelsus